Wine review – Mount Majura, David Hook, McW Reserve 660

Mount Majura Canberra District Mondeuse 2016 $29
DNA analysis by Jose Vouillamoz in 2008 revealed Savoie red variety, mondeuse noire, to be either a half-sibling or grandparent of Australia’s signature variety, shiraz. Mount Majura’s Frank van der Loo first tasted mondeuse in France’s Savoie area early this century and was “struck by its delicious spicy character”. He planted mondeuse at Majura in 2010 and released the first wine in 2015. The second vintage provides unique medium-bodied drinking, featuring bright, fruity flavours reminiscent of summer berries infused with spice.

David Hook Central Ranges Hilltops Nebbiolo 2015 $38
Hunter-based David Hook sources fruit from the NSW Central Ranges area, including the Hilltops Region, centred on Young. Piedmontese red variety nebbiolo makes light coloured, highly aromatic wines with an at-times aggressive bite of tannin that seems at odds with the light colour. Hook’s version captures the variety’s alluring floral notes and fruity–savoury flavours. However, while the tannins give notable grip to the finish, they are comparatively tame for nebbiolo and work well with savoury food.

McW Reserve 660 Canberra District Syrah 2016 $22–$28
Former Canberran Jim Chatto now heads the McWilliams winemaking team where he presided over production of this juicy, loveable Canberra shiraz. I came across it in Dan Murphys, Cairns, while guiding an old mate through the confusing world of wine. Served lightly chilled in the warm FNQ climate, the wine impressed for its vivid crimson colour and equally vivid fruit flavours. A touch of spice, typical of Canberra shiraz, and fine, soft tannins completed a delicious drink-now dry red of real character.

Mount Majura Canberra District Touriga 2016 $29
Touriga provides an earthy, grippy contrast to Mount Majura’s bright and chirpy mondeuse, also reviewed today. Touriga shares mondeuse’s vibrant freshness and medium body. But earthy, savoury character and fine, grippy tannins give it a distinctly separate character. Winemaker Frank van de Loo suggests this late ripening variety’s success in Canberra is due to recent warm vintages. He writes, “The 2015–2016 season was our warmest to date (as measured by heat degree days), illustrating the ongoing effect of global warming”.

Copyright © Chris Shanahan
First published 1 August 2017 in the Canberra Times

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